Author: Norman Medoff and Edward Fink

Norman Medoff and Edward Fink

Dr. Medoff is Director of the School of Communication at Northern Arizona University. He has taught and served as an administrator at three different universities, produced numerous television and corporate video projects, and has overseen the productions of many students. Dr. Medoff has authored articles in scholarly journals as well as trade and consumer magazines. He has also written textbooks on the Internet and mass media, television production, and electronic media. In addition, he has served as president of the Broadcast Education Association and has recently been the recipient of a Fulbright Specialist Grant. Dr. Fink is Professor and Chair of the Department of Radio-TV-Film at California State University, Fullerton. He teaches courses in production, writing, media history, and children's TV. Dr. Fink has published papers on topics such as digital video in the classroom, the application of drama to video production, music in primetime drama, and comedy writing. He is also the co-author of textbooks on telecommunications and studio television production.

Posts by Norman Medoff and Edward Fink:

FIGURE 4.3 This sequence of shots about diversity in golf opens with (1) an ELS to establish the topic and setting, then uses (2) an MS of a young player to reveal the wide spectrum of golfers, followed by (3) a CU of a club hitting a ball, with a cut to (4) an MS of a golfer finishing his swing. Then (5) a canted angle of a golfer lining up a putt adds variety, as does (6) a low-angle shot and (7) a high-angle shot, followed by (8) a CU of a putt, then (9) an ECU of the universal frustration of the ball almost going in but not quite, ending with (10) an ELS as another golfer pushes on.

The Long Shot – Beginning the Story

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The long shot (LS) is sometimes called the wide shot (WS) and is also known as the establishing shot, the master shot, or the cover shot. It is generally the first shot a photographer should take. It is the most important shot in terms of establishing the setting and action. Typically, it shows the subject…

Photo by Horia Varlan

Copyright 101 for Your Video Project

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If you expect your video project to really be yours after completion, make sure that all the material you use has been created by you or by people who are working for you. If you or one of your coworkers uses material owned by others, you may find yourself spending time with lawyers instead of…

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